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Monday, August 8, 2016

Real Time QA Interview Questions with Answers For Experienced.

Real Time QA Interview Questions with Answers For Experienced. Latest Quality Analyst Interview Questions And Answers. Most Commonly Asked QA Interview Questions.

Q1. Can you tell me about yourself?​​

This is really more of a request than a question. But these few words can put you on the spot in a way no question can. Many quickly lose control of the interview during the most critical time- the first five minutes. This is not the time to go into a lengthy history or wander off in different directions. Your response should be focused and purposeful. Communicate a pattern of interests and skills that relate to the position in question. Consider your response to this question as a commercial that sells your autobiography. Provide an answer that includes information about where you grew up, where you went to school, your initial work experience, additional education and special training, where you are now, and what you intend to do next. One of the most effective ways to prepare for this question is to develop a 60-second biographic sketch that emphasizes a pattern of interests, skills, and accomplishments. Focus your response around a common theme related to your major interests and skills. Take, for example, the following response, which emphasizes QA experience and education.
“In my QA career, I have been working on various system platforms and operating systems Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8 and UNIX. I have tested applications developed in Java, .NET, Ruby, PHP and so on. I have tested Web-based applications as well as client server applications. As a QA person, I have written Test Plans, Test Cases, attended walkthrough meetings with the Business Analysts, Project Managers, Business Managers and QA Leads. Attended requirement review meetings and provided feedback to the Business Analysts.
I have also tested Mobile Applications on different IOS and Android platforms to make sure that the applications also works accordingly in mobile devices.
I have worked in different databases like Oracle,MySQL and SQL, wrote queries to retrieve data from the database. As far as different types of testing is concerned, I have performed Smoke Testing, Functional Testing, Backend Testing, BlackBox Testing, Integration Testing, Regression Testing and UAT (User Acceptance Testing) Testing. I have participated in Load Testing and Stress Testing. I have written defects as they are found using Application Life Cycle Management(ALM)/QC, BugZero and JIRA. Once the defects were fixed, retested them and if they passed, closed them. If the defects were not fixed, then updated the status accordingly. I have also attended the defect assessment meetings as necessary. In the meantime, a continuous interaction with developers was necessary. This is pretty much what I have been doing as a QA person.

I am prepared to answer any questions you may have about my education and experience.”
This response sets a nice tone for starting the interview. The interviewee is able to say a lot within 60 seconds by staying focused. The message is clear: the interviewee has both passion and focus relating to the position. He stays on message and concludes by leaving the door open for additional questions about his education and experience. Unfortunately some candidates get off on the wrong foot by rambling on for several minutes about their childhood, family, hobbies, travels, and interests.

Q2. What did you do in your last project?


Ans: In my last project, the application was a web-based application developed in Java platform. As a QA Person, I wrote Test Plans from the requirement documents and Use Cases. I performed Smoke Testing, Functional Testing, Backend Testing, BlackBox Testing, Integration Testing, Regression Testing and UAT (User Acceptance Testing). I have participated in Load Testing and Stress Testing. I attended several walkthrough meetings for requirement reviews and provided feedback to the Business Analysts. Mostly, I was in the backend testing, which required writing SQL queries directly to the database. Besides these, I wrote defects using ClearQuest. Once the defects were fixed, retested them and if the passed, closed them. If the defects were not fixed, then reopened them.

Q3. Have you written Test Plan? What is a Test Plan? What does it include?

Ans: A Test Plan is a document describing the scope, approach, resources, and schedule of intended testing activities. It identifies test items, the features to be tested, the testing tasks and who will do each task (roles and responsibilities) and any risks and its solutions. What does it include? A Test Plan includes Heading, Revision History, Table of Contents, Introduction, Scope, Approach, Overview, different types of testing that will be carried out, what software and hardware will be required, issues, risks, assumptions and sign off section. A sample test plan is given below:


Q4. Have you written a Test Case? What is a Test Case? What does it include?


Ans: Yes. Writing test cases is one of my main duty in my current and previous jobs. A Test Case is a document that describes step by step process of how to test the application. A Test Case mainly includes Test Case ID, Steps Description, Expected Output, Actual Output, Pass/Fail, Remarks. But it mainly depends on a organization needs and how they want their test cases to be designed. The link of some sample test case documents are given below:

Q5. How many Test Cases did you write in your last project?
Ans: I wrote about 1100 Test Cases in my last project. (The reasonable number of Test Cases varies from 500 to thousands. The number 1100 test cases can be completed in a 6 month project duration).

Q6. What document did you refer to write the Test Cases?

Ans: Requirement document. (NOTE: It can also be Use Cases, or Design Document) (Note: It depends company to company. In some companies, they use Use Cases. In some companies, they use Requirement Documents and in some companies, they use Design Document. However, in practical scenario, most of the companies have requirement document at least).

Q7. What is positive testing? Negative testing? Compare the two.


Ans: When you test an application with the correct data, ensuring that everything works as it should with expected user behavior, you are performing a positive test. For example, if a password only allows numbers, you would only put numbers into this field with a positive test. If everything works as it should, your program has passed this particular positive test.

When you test an application with incorrect data, ensuring that errors don’t occur with unexpected user behavior, you are performing a negative test. Using the previous example, you would put both numbers and letters into the password field with a negative test. If an error message occurs, you know that your program has passed this particular negative test; it didn’t let you into the system when there was unexpected behavior.

Negative testing ensures that everything works when there is unexpected user behavior, while positive testing ensures that everything works when the end user does what the program expects. In other words, negative testing makes sure that things that shouldn’t work, don’t, while positive testing makes sure that things that should work, do.

Q8. What is a primary key? What is a unique key? How are they different?

Ans: A primary key is a column in a database where each row has a unique value. Each table has only one primary key. No NULL values are allowed. A unique key is a column or group of columns that together hold unique values.  A table can have more than one unique key.  For example, in a list of American Citizens, the column with social security numbers would be a primary key whereas the first and last name columns combined with phone number would be a unique key.

Q9. What is the difference between requirements and specifications?

Ans: Requirements are the features, functions, and goals of the proposed software system as defined by the client. For example, a company may want their software to “Store shopping cart data for at least 30 days.” This would be a requirement.
Specifications, on the other hand, explain how these features, functions, and goals are to be met. For example, a specification would be “A user’s session information will be persisted into the operational datastore upon logout or session timeout and maintained for 30 days.”

Q10. When do we perform functional testing?


Ans: Functional testing tests the code from end-to-end, making sure that all parts of the application are working –- even the parts that occur during failures. Functional testing should start early. Planning can be initiated during the analysis phase, and functional testing should start well before development is complete. It is common to start running functional tests within the QA department once a Minimum Viable Product is released.

Q11. Did you have a situation where you did not have any documents (no requirement document, no Use Cases, or no Design Document) and you had to write the Test Cases? How did you write the Test Cases?

Ans: Yes. I have been to that kind of scenarios several times. There were companies where they had no documents at all. In that case, I had to discuss the application scenario and functionality with the Business Analysts or developer. I kind of prepared a document in consultation with Business Analysts and Developers and then started writing Test Cases.

Q12. Have you worked with the Uses Cases before?

Ans: Yes. I have written Test Cases using Use Cases.

Q13. Can you tell me what a Use Case is?

Ans: A use case is a document that describes the user action and system response for a particular functionality.  For example,  a Use Case for ATM
System can have the following user interactions:

Sample Use Case

Flows of events for the above Use Case:

System Start up Use Case

The system is started up when the operator turns the operator switch to the “on” position. The operator will be asked to enter the amount of money currently in the cash dispenser, and a connection to the bank will be established. Then the servicing of customers can begin.

System Shutdown Use Case


The system is shut down when the operator makes sure that no customer is using the machine, and then turns the operator switch to the “off” position. The connection to the bank will be shut down. Then the operator is free to remove deposited envelopes, replenish cash and paper, etc.
Session Use Case

A session is started when a customer inserts an ATM card into the card reader slot of the machine. The customer may abort the session by pressing the Cancel key when entering a PIN or choosing a transaction type.
(The above are some sample Use case flow just for understanding)


Q14. What is a Use Case and what does it include?
Ans: A Use Case is a document that describes the user action and system response for a particular functionality. It includes cover page, Revision History, Table of Contents, Flow of Events (normal flow and alternative flow)

Q15. What is Software Development Life Cycle?

Ans: The systems (or software) development life cycle (SDLC) is a conceptual model used in project management that describes the stages involved in an information system development project, from an initial feasibility study through
maintenance of the completed application.

It includes the following different stages:

1.  Requirement phase
2.  Design phase
3.  Coding (programming)
4.  Testing
5.  Release (Production)
6.  Maintenance (Support)
SDLC Diagram


Q16. What is Business Requirement Document (BRD)?
Ans: It is a document that describes the details of the application functionality which is required by the user. This document is written by the Business Analysts.


Q17. What is Software Testing Life Cycle (STLC)?
Ans: The testing of software has its own life cycle.  It starts with study and analyzing the requirements.
Here is the software testing life cycle:
1.  Requirement Study
2.  Test Planning
3.  Writing Test Cases
4.  Review the Test Cases
5.  Executing the Test Cases
6.  Bug logging and tracking
7.  Close or Reopen bugs
STLC Diagram


Q18. What is Business Design Document?
Ans: It is the document which describes the application functionality of the user in detail. This document is the further details of the Business Requirement Document. This is a very crucial step in the SDLC. Sometimes the Business Requirement Document and Business Design Document can be lumped together to make only one Business Requirement Document.


Q19. What is Code Generation or Program?
Ans: Coding is the process of translating the Business Design Document into the machine readable form. If the design is done in detailed manner, the Code Generation can be done without much application. Programming tools like Compilers, Interpreters and Debuggers are used to generate the code thru different high level language like C, C++, Pascal, Java.

Q20. What is a Module?

Ans: A ‘Module’ is a software component that has a specific task. It can be a ‘link’ which can go inside to its component detail.

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